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, 70,000 have been killed since protests against syrian president assad. robert frod testified at a robert ford testified at a hearing. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through the street, chanting, peaceful. what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. we are now two years into that syria and uprising. for two leady years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in the works. then it bet on moscow to play a constructive role. this is the assad who is bombing villages in syria. this is the assad who is ordering teenagers tortured. frankly, he is engaged in murdering his populist. the ancient city is now in ruins. 70,000 syrians are dead. a million refugees has spilled into neighb
, as this crisis in syria reaches what could be a tipping point where there are reports that president assad, although still unconfirmed and his people are saying, no, no, it was the rebels, but it looks more likely to be assad's forces, have used chemical weapons killing 16 people, wounding scores more. how significant is this, do you think? >> reporter: well, first of all, it needs to be substantiated if those chemical weapons were in fact used. there has been, as you mentioned, conflicting information over at the regime that's accusing the rebels of firing these weapons, and the rebels are saying that's absolutely impossible. we do not even have that kind of weapon which at our disposal, but military analysts do believe that syria has won of the largest stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world, and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers, saying that there is a high probability that the assad regime has, in fact, used chemical weaponry although they are waiting final verificatiove. bearing in mind, too, there's been allegations in the past that chemical weapons we
on virtually a daily basis now in support of basharof al-assad, which was an inadvertent consequence.an but it stems from the fact that no forces were there to govern iraqi airspace.go second, if we had had even just 1,000 special forces there,st special operations forces to work with the iraqis special operations forces we would have been much more effective against al qaeda in iraq, which is largely defeated during the surge, but not epityler. al qaeda in iraq is now morphed into the anasra front, the primary jihadi organization in syria that is causing us so much heartburn. >> rose: okay, we want to talkch about that when we continue with this segment and some other people who have written about and were reporters there, including john burns, and fouad ajami, dexter filkins, to talk about the implications also in this book-- and michael will stay with us-- having to do witl how do you measure the iraqi war after 10 years, 4,500 american lives, some 30,000 came home injured, $2 trillion, i think, is the number they put on it, correct? >> you can calculate it aboutn three different
publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a choice that he made. one would assume that declaring it publicly involves a commitment by the united states which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that, therefore, we have the means and the strategy for achieving that objective. it soon turned out that this was a rhetorical commitment without a real capacity for follow through on our part. so we went to the u.n., and we demanded that the u.n. security council support us on this. not surprisingly, the russians and the chinese said, well, we don't share this conclusion, and we're not going to join you in forcing assad out, and we object, and the resolution failed. we thereupon denounced the russians and chinese as having engaged in a stance that is infantile and disgusting, those were the words used by our ambassador to the u.n. which is not a way of soliciting their support for further -- [laughter] further common policy. on top of it, it became increasingly clear that the opposition to assad is very mixed. some of it involves some of our friends who are sponsori
his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is a kinship between shia and alouites, is a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within their record to help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like rushing, when-- hen am's regine, and we people see an uprising in spirit, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat -- islamists in iraq see the th reat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. is this fear o
whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is what is going on now. at the same time, supporting the opposition, at least those elements of the opposition which we believe are positive, constructive, progressive elements, but that are not the extreme element that otherwise could turn syria into a, if possible, hard to imagine, even, worst case, than is with a
at this point. malaki's focus is not having a regime in syria. our focus is not allowing assad to continue to exist. >> that's right. the shia regime doesn't want to see a sunni regime in syria. iran wants to maintain assad's power and iran is shipping weapons through iraq to syria. many people say it's those weapons and a lot of the training coming from iran that is propping up the aassad regime in syria. if we can cut that off, we might be able to cut off the weapons propping up in the assad regime. we can't get those flights to land, be inspected. if jordan has intelligence there's weapons on those flights we can't cut it off. it is a damned shame because we spent all that time, blood in iraq, we should have that type of relationship where we can stop that. instead we can't. >>brian: secretary of state condoleezza told us here that status agreement was written to be renegotiation before it was up. if that was renegotiated successfully we would have had presence in the region and you could argue there would not be the intertribal strife they're witnessing right now. therefore, we would h
. but maliki has his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is it the kinship between shia and alouites, is it a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within iraq? help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like saddam's regime, when people see an uprising in syria, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. it is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on th
about syria's future once president assad leaves office. >> i'm very concerned becoming an enclave for extremists because they thrive in chaos. >> dan: during his visit to israel he helped broker a phone call between benjamin netanyahu and his turkish counterpart to restore diplomatic relations. netanyahu apologized for the deaths of nine turkish activists and naval raid on gaza bound flotilla. he helped arrange that call before leaving israel. palestinians are clearly frustrated. they say president obama's message of hope is empty, just words. the story now from our reporter. >> president obama's last trip took him to bethlehem. highlight of this trip that has strengthened bonds with israelis but frustrated palestinians. they vented their anger with protests fueled in part by obama not condemning israeli settlements to build houses on land long held by palestinians. for families like these. today their house is an island. this is how over the past 30 years a nearby israeli settlement has grown, swallowing up almost half their land. rest cut off my a security fence. it's like we're
to the geneva commune kay for those of us engaged in that effort anything that supports president assad is problematic. >> problematic indeed. iraq however along with iran defends the oversight. malki basically says and senior officials say that the flights are for humanitary concerns. secretary kerry says the over flights are something that are threatening the relations between u.s. and fragility. secretary kerry goes on to say that for iraq to move forward it must have fair leblgss. he says quote there's an enormous investment of our treasure our people and our money into this initiative. the world has an interest in seeing iraq take the leading role as a functioning democracy. due though that elections will be critical. if iraq remains conclusive and cohesive it has a chance of succeeding. heather? >> kelly wright thank you so much. >> the time now 11 after the top of the hour. after a week cbs finally addresses the controversy over this memorial being used as a prop during the show "the amazing race." was it enough? >> we report you decide. >> why people are flocking to this particu
and white house press secretary jay carney issued a warning to the assad regime. >> we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. we are deeply skeptical of a regime has lost all credibility and warn the regime against making these kind of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> neither side of the conflict has provided documentation that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i
, he made strong comments regarding syria and president assad. i can't make tough words when you have weak actions. the united states has been absent much to the discredit to the united states and so the president is tough on his rhetoric highlighted the fact he has been very weak on his actions. second of all, the tone of the president's remarks regarding the israeli peace process. he no longer said to the israelis, you have to start by making concessions and you need to get back to the table. he took a much different tone. i thought it was right that he basically said to the palestinians, don't have preconditions. don't make this impossible to begin, but i thought it was most interesting he tried to go around the israeli leadership and said to the israeli people, leaders are never going to act unless you make them act. for a guy that has gone out of his way that we shouldn't be interfering with the interterm affairs of other countries, i thought it was unusual way to undo some of the good that he did at the have a tail end of his visit. he said forget everything i said about develop
in an apparent assassination attempt. that's according to opposition forces. they say colonel rial assad was injured when his car was targeted in an explosion. >> they would not confirm reports that his foot actually had to be amputated. he's head of the free syrian army. he is not related to the syrian president. what the video shows is what is said to be the aftermath of that blast. >> also in syria opposition leader tried to resign yesterday but the national coalition's executive committee said no. so he agreed to stay on until the group's next meeting. >> he says powerful countries are using the syrian crisis to advance their own interests. he plans to talk about it at the arab league summit going to happen later this week. >>> and now to a man who has defied threats on his life to return home. >> we're talking about pakistan's former president. he arrived in the port city of karachi on sunday. pervez musharraf spending almost five years in self-imposed exile. >> mainly in london and also dubai. he actually faces criminal charges at home. and get this, the taliban, well, they're thre
iraq of helping syrian president bashar al assad arm fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> and new this morning, former penn state assistant football coach jerry sandusky breaking his silence from behind bars. a documentary filmmaker saying he has recorded telephone conversations with sand us ki that will air today on nbc. the family of the late joe paterno, the head football coach whose career ended in disgrace are already speaking out. they called the recording quote a sad and unfortunate development saying it's transparently self-serving, and yet another insult to the victims and anyone who cares about the truth in this tragic story. >>> a public memorial service for colorado's prison chief will be held today in colorado springs. tom clement was laid to rest yesterday in a private funeral. he was shot and killed tuesday in his driveway. the parolee authorities believe did it was killed thursday in a shutout in texas. he's also believed to have killed a pizza deliveryman. >>> and the supreme court takes up the issue of same-sex marriage starting tomorrow dozens of pe
. >> it's not about one person. it's about president assad, it's about a regime that is killing its own people. it's about an opposition that is bigger than one person, and that opposition will continue. >> and the split between the opposition civilian leaders and its fighters is growing. the rebels rejecting a new provisional prime minister. one expert on syria says the country now is headed for a complete meltdown if the obama administration doesn't stop hedging its bets. >> we waited, it didn't get any better. president assad is not stepping aside, and the opposition is becoming more extremist, because they are the ones receiving the political support and the arms. >> ironically, this lack of unity among the opposition is only reenforcing the administration's belief that it should be cautious in what kind of help and assistance it provides the opposition. kate? >> jill dougherty, thanks so much, jill. >>> you heard in jill's piece, mike rogers. the michigan republican is joining me live from lansing, michigan, for more on this. mr. chairman, thanks so much for taking the time. >> tha
sit down and figure out what happens to syria after their president assad is gone. convincing iraq to stop that, the iraqi election to prime minister al-maliki recently and suddenly delayed for six months and secretary of state is to convince him and reverse course and not waiting for a vote. and a meeting got underway in the last half hour or so, at some points we expect to see kerry at a solo press conference in iraq and we hope to get an update then about how things have been going on this surprise trip. back to you in new york. >> alisyn: peter, thank you very much for the update. let's get to the rest of your headlines. another fox news for you right now. let's take a live look from vatican city. this is pope francis celebrating palm sunday mass in a packed st. peter's square and next to easter the most holy day in the catholic church. this is a day after pope francis met with pope emeritus benedict xvi, and the two spoke privately for about 45 minutes and then the two prayed side by side. a tragic skydiving accident in florida that left two people dead. an experienced instruc
, targeted strikes against assad's aircraft and scud missile batteries on the ground and the establishment of safe zones inside syria to protect civilians and opposition groups. ten years after the start of iraq war, they're rattling the sabers again. >> right. so we've got to put this into a bit of context here. because syria, look, there isn't iraq or nothing. >> right. >> iraq has to be put into its context. john mccain and lindsey graham were two of the cheerleaders even before bush came in, right? there was a whole group of them in the senate saying we needed to invade iraq. along the way when they realized there were no weapons of mass destruction, when they realized this was a complete quagmire, the thing they said it would never be, what they actually said was toent worry about it because we've got another rationale here. we're going to spread democracy. remember? freedom on the march? this is a language they don't understand. culture they don't understand. where having a large foreign invasion has a long and sad track record of failure. now, that's not to say it cannot be done. yo
acquiring a nuclear weapon. >> will syria's civil war spill over? >> assad's regime must understand they will be held accountable for the use of chemical weapons or their transfer to terrorists. >> the president's one-time middle east peacemaking. is now the time to kiss and make up? >>> this is "piers morgan live". you've heard a lot of heated debate on this show on both sides. tonight i'm going to talk to five men who probably know more than most of us about guns and in particular the aftermath of the atrocity of newtown. they're police chiefs in and around newtown. all of them having experience and trauma of that terrible day at sandy hook elementary school. sadly, the toll of guns doesn't end there. tom clements was gunned down in the doorway of his home last night, hours before governor john hicken loafer signed new gun control legislation. >>> plus, something special tonight. we conduct an informal account of u.s. senators asking whether or not they would have supported dianne feinstein's proposed ban on assault weapons. the numbers are not official and in some cases the answe
it difficult for it to part ways with assad, but they recognize, i think already, that they must do so and are embarking on a transition there. russia's relationship with iran is very important. remember, they once shared a long border when russia was the soviet union, and they've had a fraught relationship on and off at times. so we can enlist their support sometimes and other times that will not be the case. but we have to be patient and firm. again, our policies should be based on our self-interest, not trusting or mistrusting any other leader. >> diplomat and former senate majority leader george mitchell, thanks for joining us. >> thanks, jake. >>> those russians are seeing red over an 11th hour bailout plan to save the small island of cyprus. it's not that the country wanted cyprus to go under. it's that some russian investors will take the biggest hilt. the plan basically says, let's have cyprus pay its bills by using money from deposits of more than 100,000 euros. that's because nothing else is insured. p but aa lot of those deposits come from russian oligarchs. despite the ange
. not long thereafter the president of the united states declared publicly that assad's syria has to go. that was a choice that he made. one would assume that declaring it publicly involves a commitment by the united states, which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that therefore we have the means and the strategy for achieving the objective. it soon turned out that this was a rhetorical commitment, without a real capacity for follow through on our part. so we went to the u.n., and we demanded that the u.n. security council support us on this. not surprisingly, the russians and the chinese said we don't share this conclusion, and we're not going to join you enforcing assad outcome and we reject, and the resolution failed to we thereupon denounced the russians and the chinese as having engaged in a stance that is infantile and disgusting. those are the words used by our ambassador to the u.n. which is not a way of soliciting their support for further -- [laughter] -- further policy. becoming increasingly clear that the opposition to tal afar i can assad a very mixe
was the first arab leader to call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence that was being inflicted on the syrian people and jordan has played a leading role and trying to begin a political transition towards a new government and we're working to strength and credible syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the border so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis, the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day-- the neighbors far from home, this is a heavy burden, and the international community needs to step up to make sure that they're helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single-- >>. >> we've been listening to president obama with king abdullah and they've been talking about the allegiance to each other, or alliance i should say. and the syrian confl
in the hands of the u.n. they're testing it for nerve gas after the assad regime and the rebel forces accused one another of shooting off deadly missiles suspected of carrying chemical weapons. >>> and this is a sign you need new brakes. look at this. a cadillac smack dab on a roof of a house in california. the couple inside told our affiliate wabc they were driving down a hill and couldn't stop, turn a corner. next thing they knew, boom, off the road, in the air, on a roof. >> the air bag deployed and i don't even see where we're going from there because the view was obscured and i just couldn't stop. we're very, very lucky. >> so lucky indeed. a neighbor used a ladder to help this couple out. it took a crane to get this cadillac off the roof. authorities say there was a man inside the house, but he was not hurt. wow. >>> bad news for tourists and history buffs here. new york's iconic ellis island will not be opening anytime soon. the national parks service says damage from superstorm sandy was so bad, they don't have a projected reopening date. repairs could cost up to $59 million. >>> he c
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)